Author Topic: Alternate core mechanic (Trollworld)  (Read 2841 times)

Antisinecurist

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Alternate core mechanic (Trollworld)
« on: November 07, 2013, 08:17:39 PM »
So, inspired in part by trollbabe, I devised a new alternate core mechanic (not sure what to use it for).
So, the character has a single stat rating, which varies from 1-12 (maybe shrink the range down for balance purposes? Like 4-9).
There are two roll types which correspond to your moves. They might be, for example, Might and Finesse.

Rolls work like this: It's always a 2d6 roll. When you roll*might, if you roll equal to or over your stat, it's a near hit. If it's 3 or more greater than your stat, it's a hit. Otherwise, a miss. When you roll*finesse, if you roll equal to or lower than your stat, it's a near hit. If it's 3 or more less than your stat, it's a hit. Otherwise, a miss.

Hits correspond to 10+. Near hits correspond to 7-9.

A "balanced" choice, 6 or 7, gives the same # of hitting, near hitting, and missing numbers as a +0 and +1 in AW.
So, the target numbers might need to shift a little.

Further, I haven't accounted for the curve of 2d6, but I don't think it'll cause much effect (except tending towards the middle).

Any questions/comments/ideas about this potential method?
You can keep the core move mechanics but it shifts your stats to an either/or balance.
- Alex

77IM

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Re: Alternate core mechanic (Trollworld)
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2013, 02:52:51 AM »

To me, the AW rules revolve around moves -- the stats are derived from moves, the playbooks are mostly just collections of moves, the gear is defined such to work well as part of moves, the MC's participation is a list of moves, etc. Obviously there's more to the rules than just moves, but very little that doesn't interact closely with moves. I love this because the very structure of moves cuts out a lot of the bullshit that weighs down other RPGs; it's hard to write a pointless move without making it obvious how pointless it is.

So this proposal sounds like defining stats and stat-limits totally disconnected from moves, e.g., without due regard to what the PCs are actually going to do during the game and whether this mechanic is the best way for them to do it (or at least a better way than the existing stats). Maybe if you explain your motivation or intention more I would have better feedback.

-- 77IM

Antisinecurist

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Re: Alternate core mechanic (Trollworld)
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2013, 10:36:02 PM »
Oh, I know it'd have to be tied to some real concrete thing in a particular game!
It's a shiny fragment of a thing for a hack, not all helpful on it's own.

But, if I had to say, I'd use it for a game where I wanted to stress two diametrically opposed arenas of conflict or something.
I don't know, some examples?

Cyberpunk: Reality VS The Matrix
Swords & Sorcery: Might VS Magic
Cthulhu Mythos: Sanity VS Insanity (sanity is used for mundane tasks, insanity is used for horror checks, lore checks, sorcery, whatever)
Hypothetical game about gangbangers trying for success in some legit enterprise: Business VS The Streets
Hypothetical game about lycanthropes: Man VS Beast

You maybe get the idea?
It's only a tiny mechanic for a hack where you use the traditional roll+stat model but want two stats in tension.
It can even be used alongside other stats (like 3/4 "normal" stats and two paired stats like this).

Maybe that is more clear?
I'm not working on a concrete thing, just adding an option to people's toolboxes (much like, oh, using a deck of cards in Murderous Ghosts, which I hope to see in a hack someday!).
- Alex

plausiblefabulist

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Re: Alternate core mechanic (Trollworld)
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2013, 04:33:22 PM »
Another example of the same kind of tradeoff tension between two stats in a Powered by the Apocalypse hack is The Angel from Monsterhearts: http://buriedwithoutceremony.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/The-Angel.pdf