Author Topic: Sort of a random question.... about book size and margins...  (Read 1970 times)

Evenglare

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Sort of a random question.... about book size and margins...
« on: September 08, 2013, 09:54:35 AM »
So, I'm creating a sort of "hack" for dungeon world as dungeon world did for apocalypse world. In anycase it's called Crystal World and it focuses on emulating final fantasy in a tabletop game I know there have been several attempts over the years using other systems that did not go well. I am hopeful though about this system since battle is arbitrary and it has a very easy system to learn. ANYWAY that's not what this topic is about. I am planning on basically recreating dungeon world's design of the book, so my question is what are the sizes and margins for dungeon world?

On another note, I'm confused about multiclassing in dungeon world. It states that when you multiclass "you get to choose any move your level or lower" (pg 29). However on the same page in the margin it states that you choose a move from 1 level lower than your current class. This is also brought up on page 346 which states "is why the multiclass moves
act as one level lower, so that each classís niche is somewhat protected"

Am I just completely missing something? It seems like the book is contradicting itself.
Preemptive- thanks for the response!
« Last Edit: September 08, 2013, 10:02:42 AM by Evenglare »

ScottMcG

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Re: Sort of a random question.... about book size and margins...
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2013, 04:56:33 PM »
There can be a bit of confusion around multiclassing and levels as there are two different ways that levels are considered with multiclass moves, and both refer to adjusting your effective level.

The first bit of text that discusses multi-classing is on p. 32 (for me in the PDF - you mentioned p. 29, but I'm guessing we're looking at the same spot).

Quote
Multiclass Moves
The multiclass moves allow you to gain moves from another class. You get to choose any move of your level or lower. For the purpose of multiclassing, any starting class moves that depend on each other count as one moveóthe wizard's cast a spell, spellbook, and prepare spells for example. If a move from another class refers to your level, count your levels from the level where you first gained a move from that class.

Here it does indeed say "You get to choose any move of your level or lower."  The multiclass moves for each class mostly look like this:

Quote
Multiclass Dabbler
Get one move from another class. Treat your level as one lower for choosing the move.

You could take this a glitch/error in the rules, however a charitable, but consistent, reading would be that the first statement tells you that in general you can pick from the full range of moves from your level and below, and that the statement in the move itself says that while doing so you need to consider your level to be one less than it actually is.

The second part from the first text on multiclass rules says "If a move from another class refers to your level, count your levels from the level where you first gained a move from that class."  So once you've picked the move from the other class while observing the level limitations described above, any time the text of the move, or related text (such as the text in Prepare a Spell when you've taken Cast a Spell), then you consider you level to be ( your current level ) - (level at which you took the relevant multiclass move).  So if you were a fourth level fighter who took Multiclass Dabbler to gain Cast a Spell when you were a second level fighter, you would prepapre spells like so:

Prepare new spells of your choice from your spellbook whose total levels donít exceed your
own level+1 = (4  - 2 + 1) = 3.  For what it's worth, I don't know of a non-spellcasting related move that references level, at least within the base classes.

In summary, when you choose the move, you'll generally look at the options option to you as if you were that class at your current level - 1, but when using that move and the move text references your level, your effective level is = current level minus level you chose the multiclass move.

That being said, I know that some folks run the effective level as level -1 as a conscious decision about relative power/balance/usefulness of the move at higher levels. I don't think the level power curve of DW warrants that, but that's just my take.

With regard to the text in on page p. 348 (your p. 346), If this read as follows, with the bracketed text being my insertion, then it continues to be consistent.

Quote
This is why the multiclass moves act as [at least] one level lower, so that each classís niche is somewhat protected.
So, I'm creating a sort of "hack" for dungeon world as dungeon world did for apocalypse world. In anycase it's called Crystal World and it focuses on emulating final fantasy in a tabletop game I know there have been several attempts over the years using other systems that did not go well. I am hopeful though about this system since battle is arbitrary and it has a very easy system to learn. ANYWAY that's not what this topic is about. I am planning on basically recreating dungeon world's design of the book, so my question is what are the sizes and margins for dungeon world?

On another note, I'm confused about multiclassing in dungeon world. It states that when you multiclass "you get to choose any move your level or lower" (pg 29). However on the same page in the margin it states that you choose a move from 1 level lower than your current class. This is also brought up on page 346 which states "is why the multiclass moves
act as one level lower, so that each classís niche is somewhat protected"

Am I just completely missing something? It seems like the book is contradicting itself.
Preemptive- thanks for the response!

(not that) adam

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Re: Sort of a random question.... about book size and margins...
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2013, 11:33:23 PM »
and, you should really give anima prime a shot.
Oh, the things we tell ourselves to feel better about the long, dark nights.