Author Topic: Keeping it all straight  (Read 2557 times)

nemomeme

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Keeping it all straight
« on: July 17, 2010, 02:59:37 AM »
So, the threads here have been helpful, and I've done most of the work I need to do for my 2nd session Fronts, but I already suspect that a lot of the prep is going to get left behind once I'm at the table.

Like, I feel strongly that the prep will have been worth it, and I feel great comfort in the fact that if things are lagging I'll be able to look down at my possible Moves and come up with something that makes sense, but most of the time I'll be in reaction mode, just saying what seems to make sense given what's happening in that instant.

I suspect a lot of the prep is to simply arrive at the Stakes that come out of your "I wonders" and committing to not decide those things beforehand.  I think I"ll be looking first and often at those "I wonders" for scene grist.

I observe a lot of people have done or are *right now* doing the prep for the second session of their game. What do you think is the most important thing to come out of your prep?  How does it differ from your general GM prep?  What, if anything, do you think it may be teaching you?

NilsH

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Re: Keeping it all straight
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2010, 07:07:32 PM »
I didnīt, like many other it seems, really "get" how to do the front and the threats- but what it did give me was four defined groups and threats that I could build the world around. When I looked at typical moves for any of my threats they all seemed too "far away" from the actual situation. "What if the warlord makes a show of force?" They arnīt really fighting the warlord... yet. "What if the storm bars the way?"- they arnīt going anywhere at the moment. In the end I just improvised with the threats in the back of my head.

I liked the "dark future" best- it got me something to press towards- this shit will happen if they donīt do anything. I didnīt really really get the stakes, and I havnīt read trollbaby- so I didnīt have any pre-understanding from that game. Itīs was fun though to speculate about what will happen, and have questions hovering over the table.

The countdowns seem to rock for future games, the shit is progressingly hitting the fan... One session at the time, so far the players have just seen the beginning, and I know whats coming, moah- ha- ha

Chris

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Re: Keeping it all straight
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2010, 08:15:16 PM »
When I looked at typical moves for any of my threats they all seemed too "far away" from the actual situation. "What if the warlord makes a show of force?" They arnīt really fighting the warlord... yet. "What if the storm bars the way?"- they arnīt going anywhere at the moment. In the end I just improvised with the threats in the back of my head.

Well, just don't make them so far away. Are they not fighting the Warlord? Well, they are now. If the Warlord is in another town, now his dudes are here. If they don't seem inclined to go anywhere, don't bother blocking the way.
A player of mine playing a gunlugger - "So now that I took infinite knives, I'm setting up a knife store." Me - "....what?" Him - "Yeah, I figure with no overhead, I'm gonna make a pretty nice profit." Me - "......"

NilsH

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Re: Keeping it all straight
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2010, 05:41:52 AM »
Yeah, seems like good thinking.

I also think AW invites the MC to use a gamemaster technique that I havnīt used that much before- to decide where and when the characters are- and whatīs happening. I suppose itīs ok in AW to say- "your out on the road with your car and the flood is comin fast- you are suddenly blocked on both ways and soon the cannibal night hyenas are coming- what the hell are you doing out there and what do you do?"

Iīm more used to not interfering with the players power over what their characters have done and where they have gone. But I really like being able to say "a guy is trying to stab your face- who is he, and what in Gods name have you done to him?"

We get a situation that neither the MC och the players control or can foresee- and the players have to ask themselfs questions about their character- "what COULD Wilson have done to make someone that angy?"

Itīs a good way to really fast get to know the moral and ethics and also the personality of the character.

I think I will use the threats in this way more often in the future.